Articles about Food

Avocados

coveravocado

Contents Key FactsIntroductionFoodborne Outbreaks and Recalls ProductionFood SafetyConsumptionNutritionReferences Key Facts Avocados are native to the humid sub-tropical and tropical regions of central and northern South America and never go dormant.  Nearly 90% of avocado production in the United States takes place in California. Avocados are harvested by hand and start to ripen once they are picked from the tree. Commercial food safety practices for avocados have recently been strengthened due to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Avocado Surveillance Sampling Program. Foodborne illnesses associated with avocados are generally due to processed avocados and avocado-containing products such as guacamole.   Introduction The avocado Read more

Broccoli

Broccoli

Key Facts Broccoli is a member of the mustard family of plants and is closely related to Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and kohlrabi. Several broccoli-related product recalls have been reported, all associated with contamination with Listeria monocytogenes. There are two forms of broccoli: sprouting broccoli, and heading broccoli. Sprouting broccoli is the form most commonly grown in the United States. The U.S. is the 3rd largest producer of broccoli in the world, with California leading in U.S. production (90%). The majority of U.S. broccoli is harvested from mid-October through December, though crops can also be harvested through April. Broccoli Read more

Cantaloupes

Cut cantaloupe on a plate

Cantaloupes are a healthy, low-calorie source of vitamin A (β-Carotene), vitamin C, potassium, folic acid, iron, some dietary fiber, and calcium. However, the complex surface of cantaloupe makes it well suited for harboring pathogens. In recent years, cantaloupe has been the third most common produce item associated with foodborne illness outbreaks. Read more

Carrots

carrots

Carrots are a popular vegetable grown in all 50 states. They are naturally sweet, high in Vitamin A (β-carotene), and low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Proper washing, storage, and preservation methods are especially important with carrots since they are root vegetables (grown in soil). Several foodborne illness outbreaks have been associated with carrots and their juice. Read more

Cheese

USDA-cheese

Key Facts Cheese making is a way to preserve excess milk, and today about 90% of the milk produced in Wisconsin is used for cheese production. In 2014, the U.S. produced 11.45 billion pounds of cheese— including 4.9 billion pounds of Italian-type cheeses and 4.5 billion pounds of American-type cheeses. Mozzarella and cheddar are the most popular cheeses among Americans. Given the large volume of cheese produced, the incidence of foodborne illness is small, however, there have been several recent multistate outbreaks—three due to Listeria monocytogenes and one due to Escherichia coli O157:H7. In 2013, farmstead cheese products made Read more

Cucumbers

Photo Credit: Stockbyte Florida Fresh

Key Facts The top three countries that imported cucumbers to the United States in 2013 were Mexico (1,144,458,000 Ibs) Canada (215,028,000 lbs) and Honduras (65,244,000 lbs). In 2012, top cucumber producing states, as reported by the United States Department of Agriculture, were Georgia and Florida with 283.5 and 280.8 million pounds, respectively. There are three growing seasons in South Florida for field planted cucumbers; the fall season is from September to October, the winter season is from November to December, and the spring season is from January to March. In the United States from 1998 to 2013, Read more

Dry Beans

drybeans

Key Facts Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) have historically been a staple food and widely consumed source of protein and other nutrients. Generally beans are very safe but must be cooked properly to destroy lectins which can be toxic. Beans are annual row crops and include many different varieties. The per capita consumption is approximately 7.5 pounds; pinto is the most popular variety. A source of more than just protein, beans are referred to as a “superfood” due to their high nutritional value. Introduction To contribute to the Dry Bean Introduction section, please follow this link: http://fsi.colostate.edu/suggest-a-topic/ Foodborne Outbreaks Most beans contain Read more

Eggs

eggs

Key Facts U.S. shell egg production totaled 7.96 billion as of June 2014, which is 3% percent higher than it was in 2013. It is estimated that for every 100 hens, 76 eggs are produced per day. A 2010 multistate outbreak of Salmonella Enteriditis was attributed to eggs following an investigation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The source of contaminated eggs was linked to two Iowa farms and a recall of potentially affected eggs was put into effect. Between May and November 2010, approximately 2,000 illnesses resulted from this outbreak making it one Read more

Flour

flour-powder-wheat-jar

ContentsKey Facts IntroductionFoodborne OutbreaksProductionFood SafetyConsumptionNutritionReferences  Key Facts Flour is the product obtained from grinding the endosperm of uncooked cereal grains, usually wheat kernels. Although various grains, pseudo-grains, and even nuts and tubers can be used to make flour, wheat flour is the predominant choice based on baking properties. A food staple for hundreds of years, flour has emerged recently as a potential carrier of pathogens like coli and Salmonella. When grain is milled; the fatty acids oxidize, creating the potential for rancidity to develop. This process will continue with the rate depending on temperature, fat content, and grain quality. Flour Read more

Fresh Beef Products

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Key Facts Beef products are widely consumed and play an important role in the U.S. food system. Foodborne pathogens most commonly associated with beef products include STEC (shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli) and Salmonella; improper handling and cooking have been identified as key causes of foodborne illness associated with beef products. The U.S. cattle inventory (as of July 1, 2014) was 95 million, with a farm gate value of approximately $44 billion. More than 50 percent of the total value of U.S. sales of cattle and calves comes from 5 states: Texas, Nebraska, Kansas, California, and Oklahoma. The average consumption Read more