Animal Products

Cheese

Key Facts Cheese making is a way to preserve excess milk, and today about 90% of the milk produced in Wisconsin is used for cheese production. In 2014, the U.S. produced 11.45 billion pounds of cheese— including 4.9 billion pounds of Italian-type cheeses and 4.5 billion pounds of American-type cheeses. Mozzarella and cheddar are the most popular cheeses among Americans. Given the large volume of cheese produced, the incidence of foodborne illness is small, however, there have been several recent multistate outbreaks—three due to Listeria monocytogenes and one due to Escherichia coli O157:H7. In 2013, farmstead cheese products made Read more

Eggs

Key Facts U.S. shell egg production totaled 7.96 billion as of June 2014, which is 3% percent higher than it was in 2013. It is estimated that for every 100 hens, 76 eggs are produced per day. A 2010 multistate outbreak of Salmonella Enteriditis was attributed to eggs following an investigation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The source of contaminated eggs was linked to two Iowa farms and a recall of potentially affected eggs was put into effect. Between May and November 2010, approximately 2,000 illnesses resulted from this outbreak making it one Read more

Fresh Beef Products

Key Facts Beef products are widely consumed and play an important role in the U.S. food system. Foodborne pathogens most commonly associated with beef products include STEC (shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli) and Salmonella; improper handling and cooking have been identified as key causes of foodborne illness associated with beef products. The U.S. cattle inventory (as of July 1, 2014) was 95 million, with a farm gate value of approximately $44 billion. More than 50 percent of the total value of U.S. sales of cattle and calves comes from 5 states: Texas, Nebraska, Kansas, California, and Oklahoma. The average consumption Read more

Yogurt

Key Facts Yogurt is made from milk cultured with live bacteria. Yogurt is consumed in a variety of ways including Greek yogurt, drinkable yogurt, and frozen yogurt. The use of pasteurized milk is a key barrier to foodborne pathogen transmission in yogurt products. Raw milk can contain pathogens, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Campylobacter jejuni. The acidity of yogurt is another barrier to foodborne illness. There is evidence of E. coli 0157:H7 exhibiting acid-tolerant properties but this pathogen is readily destroyed via pasteurization. Yogurt products have previously been associated with fungal disease. Introduction Yogurt is made from milk Read more