Non-Produce Plants

Dry Beans

drybeans

Key Facts Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) have historically been a staple food and widely consumed source of protein and other nutrients. Generally beans are very safe but must be cooked properly to destroy lectins which can be toxic. Beans are annual row crops and include many different varieties. The per capita consumption is approximately 7.5 pounds; pinto is the most popular variety. A source of more than just protein, beans are referred to as a “superfood” due to their high nutritional value. Introduction Coming soon… Foodborne Outbreaks Most beans contain a class of protein called lectins, which have the Read more

Flour

FLOUR (Wheat flour) Key Facts Introduction (Basic topic information, botanical family, commodity group) Foodborne Outbreaks (Pathogens and or toxins associated with this food, contributing factors) Production (Where or how much is produced in US How much is imported) Food Safety contamination risk, sanitization, safe consumption) Consumption (How much is consumed in the US? How is it consumed?) Nutrition (Nutritional, culinary or cultural attributes) References Key Facts Flour is the product obtained from grinding the endosperm of uncooked cereal grains, usually wheat kernels. Although various grains, pseudo-grains, and even nuts and tubers can be used to make flour, wheat flour is Read more

Nut Butters

Courtesy of Slimquick

Key Facts Many civilizations have relied on nuts as part of their diet, even before the usage of cereal grains. Nuts come from a variety of botanical families and serve as a reliable and timely food source because they are resistant to damage by severe weather, are easily preserved through long winters to ensure a stable food supply, and provide essential fatty acids, protein, and important micronutrients. Nut butters have been associated with Salmonella outbreaks, especially Salmonella Bredeney and Typhimurium; a very large outbreak in 2010 was associated with peanut paste used in a wide Read more

Sunflower Seeds and Oil

sun-flower-209613_1920

  Sunflower Seeds Key Facts Introduction (Basic topic information, botanical family, commodity group) Foodborne Outbreaks (Pathogens and or toxins associated with this food, contributing factors) Production (Where or how much is produced in US. How much is imported?) Food Safety (contamination risk, sanitization, safe consumption) Consumption (How much is consumed in the US? How is it consumed?) Nutrition (Nutritional, culinary or cultural attributes) References Key Facts Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is one of the few crop species that originated in North America Native Americans domesticated the crop around 1000 BC 85% of the North American sunflower seed is still produced in Read more