Non-Produce Plants

Dry Beans

Key Facts Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) have historically been a staple food and widely consumed source of protein and other nutrients. Generally beans are very safe but must be cooked properly to destroy lectins which can be toxic. Beans are annual row crops and include many different varieties. The per capita consumption is approximately 7.5 pounds; pinto is the most popular variety. A source of more than just protein, beans are referred to as a “superfood” due to their high nutritional value. Introduction To contribute to the Dry Bean Introduction section, please follow this link: http://fsi.colostate.edu/suggest-a-topic/ Foodborne Outbreaks Most beans contain Read more

Flour

ContentsKey Facts IntroductionFoodborne OutbreaksProductionFood SafetyConsumptionNutritionReferences  Key Facts Flour is the product obtained from grinding the endosperm of uncooked cereal grains, usually wheat kernels. Although various grains, pseudo-grains, and even nuts and tubers can be used to make flour, wheat flour is the predominant choice based on baking properties. A food staple for hundreds of years, flour has emerged recently as a potential carrier of pathogens like coli and Salmonella. When grain is milled; the fatty acids oxidize, creating the potential for rancidity to develop. This process will continue with the rate depending on temperature, fat content, and grain quality. Flour Read more

Nut Butters

Key Facts Many civilizations have relied on nuts as part of their diet, even before the usage of cereal grains. Nuts come from a variety of botanical families and serve as a reliable and timely food source because they are resistant to damage by severe weather, are easily preserved through long winters to ensure a stable food supply, and provide essential fatty acids, protein, and important micronutrients. Nut butters have been associated with Salmonella outbreaks, especially Salmonella Bredeney and Typhimurium; a very large outbreak in 2010 was associated with peanut paste used in a wide variety Read more

Sunflower Seeds and Oil

ContentsKey Facts IntroductionFoodborne OutbreaksProductionFood SafetyConsumptionNutritionReferences  Key Facts Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is one of the few crop species that originated in North America Native Americans domesticated the crop around 1000 BC 85% of the North American sunflower seed is still produced in North and South Dakota and Minnesota. Sunflowers grow best in locations with full sun. They are remarkably tough and will grow in any kind of soil as long as it is not waterlogged. Since 2008/09, U.S. sunflower seed exports are primarily sent to Canada, Japan, and Mexico. Europeans eat sunflower seeds one at a time, therefore, they like the Read more