Articles about Food

Potatoes

potatoes

Key Facts The potato is the top non-grain food crop in the world (following corn, wheat and rice) and the number one vegetable crop in the U.S. Native to South America, potatoes have been cultivated for many centuries and belong to the Solanaceae family. Potatoes are an important source of several nutrients, especially Vitamin C. A single medium sized potato provides nearly half the daily adult requirement (100 mg) of Vitamin C and it is also a source of Vitamin B6, niacin, and potassium. Pound for pound, potatoes are one of the best values in the produce Read more

Sprouts

Key Facts Edible sprouts such as alfalfa, broccoli, mung bean, and radish sprouts, are excellent sources of antioxidants, essential amino acids, and a handful of nourishing vitamins and minerals. As such, sprouts have been championed by foodies as a veritable “superfood” in recent years and have gained significant popularity in the natural food world and beyond. Despite their nutritional advantages, sprouts carry a serious risk of foodborne illness. Seeds and beans need warm and humid conditions to sprout and grow. These conditions are also ideal for the growth of bacteria, including Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli. Raw Read more

Strawberries

Strawberries are grown in every state in the U.S. and almost every country in the world. They are an excellent source of nutrients and are a great addition to a healthy diet. Strawberries have been associated with several foodborne illnesses highlighting the importance of following recommended food safety practices from the farm to the table. Read more

Sunflower Seeds and Oil

ContentsKey Facts IntroductionFoodborne OutbreaksProductionFood SafetyConsumptionNutritionReferences  Key Facts Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is one of the few crop species that originated in North America Native Americans domesticated the crop around 1000 BC 85% of the North American sunflower seed is still produced in North and South Dakota and Minnesota. Sunflowers grow best in locations with full sun. They are remarkably tough and will grow in any kind of soil as long as it is not waterlogged. Since 2008/09, U.S. sunflower seed exports are primarily sent to Canada, Japan, and Mexico. Europeans eat sunflower seeds one at a time, therefore, they like the Read more

Sweet Corn

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Key Facts Fresh-cut sweet corn kernels are extremely perishable, with very high respiration rates, making proper temperature control critical. While there are concerns regarding various mycotoxins in field corn fed to animals, there is minimal risk associated with mycotoxins in sweet corn consumed by humans. According to the FDA, minimal traces of, fumonisins (a type mycotoxin), have been found in sweet corn (4-82 ppb). It is not uncommon for fresh corn to be preserved via canning. However, improper home-canning practices can leave low-acid foods, such as corn, at risk of developing C. botulinum. Corn cannot be safely canned using Read more

Wine

wine-grapes

Key Facts • Wine is the preferred alcoholic beverage of 35% of American adults and contributed a record $34.6 billion in sales to the U.S. economy in 2012., • Wine has religious significance, often symbolizing blood or sacrifice. It is commonly used in religious ceremonies, toasts and while cooking. • Wine is produced in all 50 U.S. States in the amount of 18.5 million hectoliters annually. The U.S. is the fourth largest country in wine production following France, Italy, and Spain. • Historically, there have not been any foodborne pathogens associated with finished wine products. The Read more

Yogurt

Key Facts Yogurt is made from milk cultured with live bacteria. Yogurt is consumed in a variety of ways including Greek yogurt, drinkable yogurt, and frozen yogurt. The use of pasteurized milk is a key barrier to foodborne pathogen transmission in yogurt products. Raw milk can contain pathogens, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Campylobacter jejuni. The acidity of yogurt is another barrier to foodborne illness. There is evidence of E. coli 0157:H7 exhibiting acid-tolerant properties but this pathogen is readily destroyed via pasteurization. Yogurt products have previously been associated with fungal disease. Introduction Yogurt is made from milk Read more